Herb of the Week ~ Mugwort

MUGWORT (Artemisia vulgaris)

Folk names: Artemis herb, Muggons, St John’s Plant, Old Uncle Henry

Planet: Venus

Element: Earth

Deities: Artemis, Diana

According to the druids, Mugwort is a plant of the Summer Solstice, traditionally being harvested around St John’s Day. One of its folk names is St John’s Plant because it was believed that John the Baptist wore it as a girdle while in the wilderness. It was believed to preserve the traveller from fatigue, sunstroke and protect against evil spirits. If gathered on St John’s Day the gatherer will be ensured protection against diseases and misfortunes.

Mugwort is associated with quartz crystal, silver, pearls and moonstone, and also the Moon tarot card. Among women’s mysteries this herb is affiliated with the Mother.

Medicinal Uses: Mugwort is an excellent menstrual regulator as well as being a nervine, diuretic, stomachic, diaphoretic and anti-diabetic. It is particularly good for pre-menstrual problems, liver cleansing, digestion, and makes a good foot bath for tired feet and legs.

DO NOT USE IF PREGNANT, BREAST FEEDING OR IN LARGE DOSES

Magickal Uses: Mugwort’s Latin name comes from the Goddess Artemis and it has become a very popular herb amongst women’s covens especially Dianic ones. It is a traditional herb to use for consecration and anointing of crystal balls and scrying mirrors but this use has now been extended to any divinatory tool. Mugwort is also burned with Sandalwood and Wormwood as incense before divination. A tea sweetened with honey can also be drunk for this purpose.

Another widespread use of Mugwort is to enhance dreams. For this a small pillow is made from purple velvet and stuffed with the dried herb. It assists in moving into the realm of the Otherworld and divining one’s future in dreams.

The protective energies of Mugwort keep one safe against all dark forces. It can be added to pouches and amulets to ensure safe travel, keep one’s home safe, and if placed in shoes will give the wearer strength and protection on long walks and runs.

mugwort

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:
Bartram’s Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine
A Compendium of Herbal Magick by Paul Beyerl
Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham
A Druid’s Herbal for the Sacred Year by Ellen Evert Hopman

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